Meat Today’s Top 4 Consumers

We’ve all had this internal debate: do I really need to read this? Will it be helpful or just a waste of time? What am I going to learn that will be valuable?

If you’re in the meat business, knowing as much as you can about your customers can have a big payoff. In order to successfully reach consumers, you’ve got to have an understanding of who they are, right?

The challenge, of course, is that consumers keep changing.

These days, consumers of multiple generations and ethnicities are the new norm, and this mix is altering the way meat is being prepared and consumed. Because of this, the “one size fits all” approach to meat marketing just doesn’t work anymore. So, you’ll need to adjust your efforts accordingly.

There are four primary consumer groups who are making the biggest impact on meat consumption trends: Millennials, Boomers, Hispanics and Asian-Americans.

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1. Millennials

There goes the “M” word again! What piece of current research could ever be complete without a mention of this key generation? Millennials are an essential group of consumers to understand because they are imposing attributes and characteristics beyond meat itself – from how cattle are raised (organically grass-fed?) to where they’re from (local?). Members of this generation are avid smartphone users and highly value social connections. Their love of technology plays a large role in influencing the way they research, purchase and prepare meat.

2. Boomers

Don’t get all caught up in Millennials and forget about those Boomers! After all, they’ve got the buying power: this group buys more at the meat case than Millennials. Boomers tend to purchase meat as an entrée while Millennials treat it as more of an ingredient or a snack. (Learn more about meat’s changing role in our Protein and the Plate research.)  Members of this generation are interested in maintaining their health and view fresh meat as an important source of protein.

3. Hispanics

Consider them the big spenders. Although members of the Hispanic population tend to be fairly price-sensitive, they spend more on food than the average U.S. household due to larger family sizes. Meat is an essential component of the Hispanic cuisine. Consumers within this group are driving growth within the meat, particularly beef, industry. Although many within this segment are younger (60 percent are under 35), they consider shopping as more of an enjoyable social activity, rather than a necessary evil. Many like to walk the entire grocery store to find new products and tastes. Pre-cooked or semi-prepared meats are typically unappealing to Hispanics because they prefer cooking fresh products from scratch.

4. Asian-Americans

This is the fastest growing ethnic segment in the U.S., with a growth rate of 25 percent between 2009 and 2014. Like Hispanics, Asian-Americans favor fresh meats, with more than 60 percent cooking from scratch. Consumers within this group are likely to live in a multigenerational household. So, these shoppers aren’t just preparing meat to feed Gen Zs, Millennials and Gen Xers – there’s a good chance they’re serving Boomers and members of the Silent generation as well. These tech-savvy trend setters are major influencers on the new flavors and cooking methods that have recently begun appearing in restaurants and grocery stores throughout the U.S.

Armed with this information, you can make decisions that will resonate with your consumers’ needs. How will you be able to engage with such a diverse group of meat consumers? Here are a few ideas to get you started:

  • When targeting Millennials, consider connecting with their social lifestyle and appeal to their social and environmental consciousness
  • When reaching out to Boomers, focus on small package sizes and the importance of maintaining good physical health
  • When catering to the needs of Hispanics, offer family-size options and fresh meat cuts that complement their cooking style
  • When engaging with Asian-Americans, provide flavors and fresh meat cuts that appeal to multiple generations

As the U.S. continues to shift into a more multigenerational and multiethnic-based culture, how do you think meat consumption will continue to change?

Please share a comment – we always love to hear from you!

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