Five Opportunities to Sell More Fresh Meat

sell-more-fresh-meatAt Midan, our Market Research Team is always scoping out the consumer trends that are having the biggest impact on the meat industry. A key part of our job is to help our clients understand the implications those trends can have on their business. By assigning meaning to facts and figures, we can help turn meat trends into opportunities.

So what opportunities should be on your radar? I’ve outlined five that you might find helpful as you jump into the new year:

  • Embrace Multi-Generations and Multi-Ethnicities
    If you pay attention to the media, you might think that Millennials are the only consumers shopping the meat case. I’m joking, of course – today’s broad and deep consumer base actually spans various cultures and generations and brings with it a range of differing values and habits.  There are four primary consumer segments affecting meat consumption trends: Millennials, Boomers, Hispanics and Asian-Americans. Members of these groups are actively influencing how fresh meat is prepared and consumed in the U.S. It’s critical to tune into the preferences and tastes of these key players so you can adjust your branding, marketing and communication efforts accordingly.

     
    Meet today’s top 4 consumer groups.

  • Promote Transparency Over Traceability
    Significant numbers of consumers value full disclosure over trace back – they’re more concerned that companies are transparent about their production practices when it comes to meat and poultry, versus exact tracking. In the 2016 Power of Meat study,  90 percent of consumers indicated a strong desire to know where their meat comes from, while only 68 percent were interested in tracing meat back to specific animals. Consumers want to know things like: Have hormones or antibiotics been used? What ingredients have been added?Are your production practices an open book when it comes to this kind of information? Being transparent is one of the fastest ways to build trust with consumers.
  • Own Protein and Other Meat Nutrients
    The meat industry has always had the best protein story, hands down. The trouble is, we aren’t telling it effectively. We are competing with yogurt and other foods on the protein battlefront when we should be the automatic victor. According to our Protein and the Plate research (conducted jointly with Meatingplace and sponsored by Yerecic Label), 70 percent of consumers said they substitute non-meat protein for fresh meat once a week.
    Unless it’s okay with you that close to three-quarters of consumers are replacing meat for at least one meal a week, we need to up our game. One way to combat this kind of substitution is to get back to the basics with consumers by reminding them that meat is one of the best protein sources on the planet as well as an excellent source of other key nutrients. We know that consumers love a good story, and we need to be telling ours.

     
    Read Danette Amstein’s blog: Resolve to Own Protein

  • Develop Value-Added Products
    Value-added items in the meat case are experiencing strong growth and there are several reasons why. Along with offering reduced preparation time and minimizing the decision-making process, these products can be sold in packages of one, two or multiple servings. More than ever, consumers crave convenience and simplicity, and the variety of package sizes meets the needs of smaller households, like Boomers. And for that younger generation that’s less educated about meat, value-added products help make dinner stress-free. It’s all about offering meal solutions that meet the needs of your consumer base.

     
    See how we helped develop the Tyson Crafted Creations brand.

  • Build Meat Brands
    You’ve heard it here before and are no doubt seeing it in our industry: commodity products are making way for branded products. Along with helping you compete in the meat case, branding is a way for you to attract new customers and generate loyalty. Branding helps build trust and a solid relationship with your company. Although the meat industry tends to be slow to change, this trend is picking up speed fast, so the time to act is now.

     
    Get meat branding tips.

Are any of these trends on your radar? Please leave a comment; I’d love to hear your feedback!

Point of View: Millennials

By Rebecca Riddle, Jr. Art Director


I am a Millennial. One of 80 million. The generation born between 1980-2000, Millennials compose the largest generation in American history. Yes, we are larger than the Baby Boomers. In three years, we’re forecasted to outspend them. We may not be your target audience now, but soon, we might be your bread and butter. Are you making an effort to reach us?

We look very different from previous generations. Only 60% of us are white. For many older Americans, this statistic is uncomfortable, but for Millennials, this diversity is normal. Race isn’t a big issue for us. A fellow Millennial Jess Rainer describes this view in his book The Millennials, “We know racism still exists. We know injustices still take place. But our world is so different from the world of the Baby Boomers. When I read about the racism and the Civil Rights Movement, particularly in the 1960s, it seems so distant.” He continues, “For us ethnic diversity is normative… [We] rarely describe someone first by their skin color or by their ethnic origin.”

We are a diverse group within ourselves. No stereotypical Millennial exists. However, common themes have impacted large segments of us. One such theme is the idea of making a difference. Jess and Thom Rainer’s research found that “nine out of 10 Millennials believe it is their responsibility to make a difference in the world.” Whereas Baby Boomers were “self-absorbed and narcissistic…three out of four Millennials believe it is their role in life to serve others.” The idea of “paying it forward” has made impact on us. We want to live great lives, not in terms of wealth, fame or power, but in terms of making a great difference. As the largest generation in American history, we have the power to do so.

The grocery store will soon feel our impact. Jefferies and Alix Partners has a study called “Trouble in Aisle 5” that signals the challenges and opportunities grocers will face as their main audience transitions to Millennials.  One transition point is the appreciation of diversity in food. Millennials are “much more willing to try different types of cuisines.” Since most Millennials consider ethnic diversity as normal, our willingness to try different ethnic foods is a natural expression of ourselves.

A lot of research is being done to accurately understand Millennials. Get to know us. What you find may surprise you!

If you’d like to learn more from “Trouble in Aisle 5,” the entire report is posted here.

If you’d like to read more from Jess and Thom Rainer’s book, you can find it here.

Rebecca Riddle, Jr. Art Director
For over a year, Rebecca has been helping to make Midan and its client look good.  She lends her graphic design skills to a range of print, online advertising and digital marketing projects. 

photo-credit