Not Your Average Carnivore

Alexandria Tyre is an Account Executive at Midan Marketing

I love cooking for family and friends. Whether it’s during the holidays, watching a college football game, or a simple weekday dinner, I take pride in preparing my guests a delicious meal. My husband actually says that the easiest way to insult me is to say that you were a guest in my home and left HUNGRY. I guess that is my Sicilian heritage surfacing!

To me, a meal is not complete without meat – unless maybe if it is a delicious bowl of risotto, but even then, a little pancetta never hurt. One of our vegetarian friends (yes, I have friends who are vegetarians) planned to join us for dinner and I was panicked. Despite being a fairly adept home cook, how was I going to make a satisfying dinner for everyone invited without meat? Needless to say, meat is the centerpiece of my meals.

So what does all of this have to do with consumer research? Well, apparently…a lot! Midan recently conducted a study to learn more about the different types of consumer segments in today’s market. According to the Meat Consumer Segmentation survey, I am a Voracious Carnivore. This surprised me as I’ve never considered myself a meat-and-potatoes type of gal. As a millennial, I’m younger than the average age of a Voracious Carnivore, and I am not from a small or rural community. But as I continue to read the segment profile, I realize that I am indeed a Voracious Carnivore.

Our household is motivated to eat more meat because it is easy and quick to prepare. Grilling a few ribeye or NY strip steaks is one of the most satiating meals, especially because clean-up is so minimal. On a regular basis I prepare a lot of chicken or ground beef because they are affordable and versatile for recipes from fajitas to meatballs. I like to keep my pantry and fridge well-stocked with basics so with the addition of protein, I can make a variety of dishes.

I also eat a lot of beef, chicken and pork because it works for my health. Despite my love of pasta and pancakes (really any carb in any format), carbs don’t work well for my waistline. Eating a protein-rich diet helps me not only maintain my weight but feel energized throughout the day. Even when I want to indulge, beef is still on the menu in the form of filet mignon with béarnaise sauce or steak frites with aioli.

To keep my diet on track, I make lists and plan my meals in advance whenever possible. Unlike most Voracious Carnivores, I do a lot of my recipe planning and grocery shopping in advance on my smart phone. However, like my fellow Voracious Carnivores, I have go-to recipes that I use frequently. Despite my routines, I appreciate stores that offer a variety of products in the meat case. I also like stores that value my loyalty and reward it with exclusive promotions or discounts because it helps me keep meat a part of my weekly meals.

Want to know what type of meat consumer segment you’re a part of? Download the FREE Meat Consumer Segmentation Executive Summary to learn more about Voracious Carnivores and its five consumer segment counterparts today!

The Selective Foodies Party

Gibson and Scout out on the town

Coca-Cola. Team Fitz. Vinegar-based BBQ sauce. Dog lover. Millennial.

Thanks to the Meat Consumer Segmentation research study, I can now add a new label to my list: Selective Foodie.

In December of 2016, Midan surveyed 2,200 meat eaters to better understand attitudes and behaviors surrounding meat purchasing and preparation. The results yielded six distinct segments of meat consumers, for which we created unique profiles to illustrate a multi-dimensional view of purchase drivers and shopping habits.

I’m a member of the smallest meat consumer segment, but what we lack in numbers, we make up for in passion! It’s never just about putting food on the table – it’s about finding the perfect recipe, crafting a complete grocery list, preparing with love (and wine) and enjoying a home-cooked meal with the fam. It’s about the experience.

If you’re hoping to appeal to Selective Foodies like me here are the two biggest ways to do so:

Build Your Brand

Because we’re a family-oriented group who values quality over price, we want to buy products we can depend on, and our devotion to national brands accomplishes that. I didn’t realize what a brand loyalist I was until my rehearsal dinner, when two of my college roommates gave my groom tips for living with me. Making the list was the need to always purchase Aveeno skin products. What can I say…they smell good!

This is also where my Millennial-ism starts showing. My generation likes finding brands they can believe in, like Endangered Species Chocolate, which does a pretty sweet job of turning cravings into philanthropy. What does your brand stand for? What’s your brand story? What are people saying about your brand? If you aren’t asking these questions, now’s the time – because Selective Foodies already are.

Sell the Experience

From community-style seating to farm-to-table décor, the restaurant industry has a strong handle on how to create an interesting dining experience that makes a perfect backdrop for Instagram posts. But a foodie is not exclusively defined by their attraction to trendy restaurants or the hottest new ingredient – again, it’s about the experience.

The Selective Foodies segment indexes high in the South, which comes as no surprise, because if there’s one thing we love in the South, it’s a story – and what’s a story without an experience? If you can illustrate what kind of experience your products offer, whether it’s a nostalgic holiday feast or lively Memorial Day bash, then you’ll get those storytelling wheels turning.

Like I said – it’s never just about putting food on the table. It’s about birthday burgers and a Panthers half-time on the half-shell. It’s watching Friday Night Lights with brisket and Shiner, because “Texas Forever.” It’s brunch with girlfriends and Ben & Jerry’s with my husband.

I could go on and on, but now I’m hungry and want to plan a party.

I’m a Premium Player. What About You?

haley-frazierWhen it comes to my shopping habits, I have always been one to know exactly what I need. I am big on making lists and hate going out of my way to make my purchases.

Hello, my name is Haley Frazier and I am a Digital Content Coordinator at Midan Marketing. But I recently found out I am also a Premium Player.

I am referring to one of the six consumer segments Midan developed from our Meat Consumer Segmentation study. We conducted research to learn more about the different types of meat consumers in the U.S. today.

I am a millennial, but don’t let my age fool you—I pay for the meat I want because I care about having quality food! That’s one of the key characteristics of a Premium Player.

Ready to learn about this Premium Player’s habits?

Saturday morning: start meal planning for the week. The first thing I do is pull out my phone and search Yummly for dinner ideas. (For you non-millennials out there, Yummly is a recipe app that provides recommendations based on your personal preference.) I like trying different recipes with fun flavors, but I tend to stick with the same meats. Once the menu is complete and the shopping list is put together, I don’t grab my keys and head to my local grocery store; instead, I grab my laptop to order my groceries online! “Okay Google, let’s go shopping!” (I love using my voice-activated assistant.)

Ordering groceries online is rather new to me, but it’s awesome. I don’t have to squeeze my way through the narrow aisles or wait in the long lines on an early Saturday morning.

After ordering all of my produce, I click over to the butcher department. When I buy my meat, I don’t focus on prices as much as I do the labels/packaging. I care about the health attributes…is it all-natural, antibiotic-free and, if I’m being honest, does the packaging appeal to me? (I like a package that looks fresh and healthy.) To me, having quality meat at every meal is important, but at times, I’m okay trying a lighter meal with a non-meat protein.

Once I finish ordering my groceries, I select the time that I am able to pick them up. When I get home and I start putting them away, I don’t think twice about putting my meat in the freezer. I know I won’t eat it fast enough and to me, freezing my meat doesn’t take away from the taste.

So how do you market to a millennial Premium Player like me? Start focusing on online shopping. Think of ways you can make your packaging not just appealing in the store, but also online. Highlight the health attributes of your meat, share various ways you can prepare the meat or offer multiple flavor options that will inspire me to add to my routine meat purchases.

Saturday evening: make a delicious meal, curl up on the couch with my cat and binge watch Netflix for the next four hours. (See, I really am a millennial!) 😉

Learn more about Premium Players and the other five meat consumer segments by downloading our free Meat Consumer Segmentation Executive Summary.

If you’d like to chat about the research, please contact Maggie O’Quinn, our New Business Development Director.

AMC 2017 Top 10

midan-marketing-team-photoBigger than ever before (with 1,300 attendees!), the Annual Meat Conference (AMC) 2017 was an awesome opportunity to hear from experts across all phases of the meat industry about what’s next for our favorite proteins. We came prepared with our trusty notepads and pens to capture the key takeaways, and we had our work cut out for us. See below for our Top 10 learnings. What were your key findings from AMC 2017? Please share below!

Midan’s AMC 2017 Top 10 takeaways:

  1. New consumer segments can help the meat industry zero in on target customers
    New research segments meat consumers into six distinct groups with unique meat shopping attitudes and behaviors. (Michael Uetz & Danette Amstein, Midan Marketing, Meat Consumer Segmentation). Learn more here.

  2. Foreign trade remains a crucial part of meat industry success
    Forecasters predict a 4.5% increase in meat exports in 2017. Export markets must grow significantly to keep supply and demand in balance. (Randy Blach, CattleFax, Market Outlook for Meat and Poultry)

  3. The meat industry continues to face stiff competition from alternative protein sources
    There are 39% more food items with protein claims on the market today than there were four years ago. (Anne-Marie Roerink, 210 Analytics, The Power of Meat: An In-Depth Look at Meat through the Shopper’s Eyes)

  4. “Environmental eating” is dramatically impacting agriculture
    Today’s agriculture has two marketplaces: Commodity [Filling/Financial] vs. Value-Added [Feelings/Flavor]. Value-added food has a “feel good” story that sells social consciousness. (Damian Mason, Agriculture: Trends, Topics, and Tomorrow)

  5. Consumers deepen bonds with brands through shared values
    61% of consumers will not buy a product if it does not meet societal obligations. (Tish Van Dyke, Edelman, Modern Marketing in the New Media Environment)

  6. Organic offers big opportunities for increased basket rings at the register
    For total U.S., annual dollars per household spent on organic is $126. “True Believers” on the spectrum of consumer segmentation spend nearly triple that amount. (Larry Levin and Steve Ramsey, IRI, The Impact of Organic and No Antibiotics Ever Positioning on Total Store Sales)

  7. There were 540 food recalls in 2016
    Food crises unfold in a predictable sequence. Prepare in advance for a food safety issue by creating an incident guide that includes staged messaging to address possible scenarios. (Jeff Hahn, Hahn Public, Emerging Consumer Concerns and Issues Management)

  8. Pig farmers are connecting directly with consumers
    The next generation of pig farmers is successfully using social media platforms (check out @RealPigFarming on Twitter) to share photos of day-to-day farm life. (Brad Greenway, US Farmers and Ranchers Alliance and Angela Anderson, National Pork Board, Communicating the Story to Consumers)

  9. Opportunity for companies ready to tailor food offerings to meet personal health needs
    While past nutrition guidelines have focused on “one size fits all” recommendations, consumers now expect a more customized approach to health and nutrition. Companies who take action now will lead the future of food (and health). (Simon Negri, A.T. Kearney and Jennifer Bentz, Tyson Foods, Inc., Personalized Nutrition: An Industry Disruptor?)

  10. FSIS easing into new requirements for ground beef recordkeeping
    FSIS has taken a six-month “soft approach” to enforcing the ground beef recordkeeping rule that became effective on 10/1/16. Retailers attempting to comply with the new rule aren’t likely to be disciplined; operators aware of the rule but ignoring it could face as-yet-unspecified disciplinary action. A new notice outlining how FSIS will enforce infractions is expected within 6-8 weeks. (Mark Dopp, North American Meat Institute and Hilary Thesmar, Food Marketing Institute, Regulatory Update)
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