Urban Eclectics, Demystified

Jo Ann and Joseph

Jo Ann with her son Joseph, her favorite Urban Eclectic

I have raised an Urban Eclectic. I am not exactly sure how it happened: one day I was doling out Cheerios to an infant in a high chair and the next I was sitting across from a 23-year-old eating kimchi for breakfast.

If you’re not familiar with Midan’s recent Meat Consumer Segmentation research yet, Urban Eclectics are one of six distinct meat consumer groups. Each consumer segment is unique with its own way of thinking about and eating meat. Urban Eclectics tend to be younger, urban, upscale and have families with children. Forty-one percent of them are Millennials (21-34 years old) and slightly more than half are male. You can also define Urban Eclectics by what they care about: novelty, variety, convenience, healthiness and animal welfare.

Based on these characteristics, it didn’t take long for me to realize that my son is likely an Urban Eclectic, although he’s on the younger end of the spectrum and doesn’t have any children. He just finished his first year of law school.

Growing up, Joseph was firmly in the “Picky Eater” segment; his diet consisted mainly of chicken nuggets and macaroni and cheese along with a few vegetables forced upon him by his mother. His taste in food has evolved gradually and by necessity. When he studied abroad in England one semester in college, food was so expensive there he bought a frying pan and learned to sauté beef and chicken for himself. This is the generation that is least educated about how to prepare meat, so if you give him a slab of protein that he can throw in the skillet or toss on the grill, he’s good to go. (I recently shared the NAMI Meat Up app with him so he could be more knowledgeable at the meat case.)

Two weeks ago my husband and I spent the weekend with him in Chattanooga, Tenn., where he has a summer law internship. Chattanooga is a neat little town; it has a scenic waterfront and a hip downtown with a cool mix of restaurants and breweries. In other words, it’s a natural habitat for Urban Eclectics.

When we arrived late Friday evening, Joseph told us that he had eaten dinner earlier at Whole Foods, where he dined on pork barbeque, roasted chicken and (gasp!) vegetables. Even though they tend to be price-conscious, Urban Eclectics place a high value on convenient meal solutions and grocers that offer fresh food, fast get their business. Why make dinner when someone else can make it for you? (This philosophy worked extremely well for my son for the first 18 years of his life.)

So think about this: Urban Eclectics comprise 33% of total meat eaters, and they are often grabbing dinner from the prepared foods case, not the meat case. One recent study states that 54% of Millennials eat out at least three times a week. Traditional meat marketing just won’t cut it with this crew, because they aren’t shopping the meat case regularly. Urban Eclectics do value in-store displays to help them make choices and get ideas, but first you’ve got to get them to the back of the store. One way to reach them is online; not surprisingly, they are the heaviest users of internet to help make pre-shopping decisions.

Urban Eclectics also care about eating “real” foods. (As a mother who made dinner just about every night, this makes me chuckle. Leave it to this younger generation to think they discovered home cooking.)

When heading out for breakfast before we left Chattanooga, my husband suggested we eat at Panera so we could get on the road quickly. Joseph was horrified. Nothing against Panera, but why go there when you can check out one of the local eateries with more “authentic” choices? We wound up at a delightful breakfast spot, where, along with your standard eggs and pancakes, you could get a breakfast rice bowl. My son ordered the Asian Breakfast Bowl with jasmine rice, glazed pork belly, house kimchi, house pickles, toasted sesame seeds and a soft boiled egg. Let’s just say, we were a million miles from Panera.

When I said eating pickles for breakfast was weird, he replied, “I don’t eat weird things; I eat normal things at weird times.” He has a point. Urban Eclectics are changing the rules of what to eat, when to eat and where to eat, and the meat industry will need to pay attention to stay tuned in to this aptly named, important group of meat consumers.

So, the long and short of it is, if you can find the perfect mix of “real” and “real convenient,” then you will have hooked the Urban Eclectics. Kids these days… they want it all, don’t they?

Learn more about Urban Eclectics and the other meat consumer segments.

Everything Old is New Again: Trends from NRA 2017

Maggie with chef Curtis Stone

Sometimes the more you look back, the further ahead you can see. This was certainly the case for the exhibiting meat companies at this year’s National Restaurant Association (NRA) Show. They demonstrated that the U.S. meat industry is staying “Ahead of the Crave” by returning to time-honored traditions that bring out the very best in our products. And the local hotspots in Chicago are completely in sync with this movement, with over-the-top meals that make us remember why we love meat.

Here are the top trends from the show and around town that stood out to this full-on foodie:

  1. The Face of the Brand: Chefs love knowing the purveyors who pour their heart and soul into their products. No one can tell their company story and family legacy of hand-crafted quality like Fred Linz and Cristiano Creminelli. The Meats by Linz and Creminelli booths showcased not only both companies’ premium product lines but also photos of the owners who have dedicated their lives to making the meat business better.
  2. Old-World Artisanal Craftsmanship: You can’t hurry the creation of world-class smoked meats. Nueske’s applewood smoked bacon is known around the world for its amazing taste and quality but perhaps Nueske’s most important ingredient is patience: the slow-burning embers – not flames – of applewood yield that amazing flavor. Cooper’s Country Meat Packers celebrates its “low and slow” tradition of smoking its sausages in a real hickory-burning smokehouse in Florence, Mississippi. The authenticity of these brands is what consumers crave!
  3. Marcus Girard holding his prized culatello

  4. Intensification of Flavors: Time is also the key ingredient behind the art and science of charcuterie, which was on full display at the show from companies such as Zoe’s, Creminelli, Olli, and Alef. I loved spending time with Marcus Girard, salumiere of Tempesta Artisan Salumi in the Premier Proteins booth; he gave me an education about culatello (a very special cured and long-aged ham) which he calls the “epitome of the passion of crafting salumi.” Dry-aged beef is another “old but modern” trend that keeps getting play among high-end steakhouses like Swift & Sons, who featured a mouthwatering umami-filled 18-ounce bone-in strip steak from Meats by Linz.
  5. The Nos Have It: Celebrating and showcasing what’s not in our meat is as important as what is in it. “Pork, salt, and spices” were the main ingredients in Jones’ Dairy Farm’s sausage in 1889 and not a lot has changed since then. This is a great thing for consumers’ taste buds and Jones is one of many meat companies who are ahead of the clean label craze.
  6. Everything Tastes Better with Pork: All of us meatheads need a little surf to balance our turf so my last night in Chicago found me at Chef Giuseppe Tentori’s GT Fish & Oyster. I was delighted to find Nueske’s applewood smoked bacon in my clam chowder and pork chicharron topping my fish tacos! Even the seafood restaurants can’t resist pork to bring out the best in their dishes.
  7. Animal Fat is Back: My favorite meal while dining in Chicago occurred at a cool hipster joint located in Logan Square called Longman & Eagle. The meal was compliments of Shawn Peerless, the chief operating officer and third generation owner of Atlantic Veal & Lamb and my new foodie friend who lives in NYC. Folks, this was a culinary exploration of animal fat like no other that would make Nina Teicholz proud. We enjoyed salted beef rinds, fried lamb necks, meatballs, chicken liver pate, a flat iron with beef tallow béarnaise, beef fat fries, bone marrow with bacon jam and pork jowl! Fat is flavor and this was by far my most flavorful meal of 2017.
  8. Let’s Talk Healthy: Both traditional meat companies and newer-to-the-game “alternative meat” companies are adapting to consumer demand for food options that meet their health and wellness goals: pea-protein burgers, chicken and quinoa burgers and all sorts of plant-based proteins were on display at the show.

As for this confirmed carnivore, please give me the “real deal”; I am all about that animal protein. We didn’t claw ourselves to the top of the food chain to eat vegetables! There are so many delicious meat delicacies to be consumed, and I am happy to report that the meat companies exhibiting at NRA 2017 did not disappoint.

Not Your Average Carnivore

Alexandria Tyre is an Account Executive at Midan Marketing

I love cooking for family and friends. Whether it’s during the holidays, watching a college football game, or a simple weekday dinner, I take pride in preparing my guests a delicious meal. My husband actually says that the easiest way to insult me is to say that you were a guest in my home and left HUNGRY. I guess that is my Sicilian heritage surfacing!

To me, a meal is not complete without meat – unless maybe if it is a delicious bowl of risotto, but even then, a little pancetta never hurt. One of our vegetarian friends (yes, I have friends who are vegetarians) planned to join us for dinner and I was panicked. Despite being a fairly adept home cook, how was I going to make a satisfying dinner for everyone invited without meat? Needless to say, meat is the centerpiece of my meals.

So what does all of this have to do with consumer research? Well, apparently…a lot! Midan recently conducted a study to learn more about the different types of consumer segments in today’s market. According to the Meat Consumer Segmentation survey, I am a Voracious Carnivore. This surprised me as I’ve never considered myself a meat-and-potatoes type of gal. As a millennial, I’m younger than the average age of a Voracious Carnivore, and I am not from a small or rural community. But as I continue to read the segment profile, I realize that I am indeed a Voracious Carnivore.

Our household is motivated to eat more meat because it is easy and quick to prepare. Grilling a few ribeye or NY strip steaks is one of the most satiating meals, especially because clean-up is so minimal. On a regular basis I prepare a lot of chicken or ground beef because they are affordable and versatile for recipes from fajitas to meatballs. I like to keep my pantry and fridge well-stocked with basics so with the addition of protein, I can make a variety of dishes.

I also eat a lot of beef, chicken and pork because it works for my health. Despite my love of pasta and pancakes (really any carb in any format), carbs don’t work well for my waistline. Eating a protein-rich diet helps me not only maintain my weight but feel energized throughout the day. Even when I want to indulge, beef is still on the menu in the form of filet mignon with béarnaise sauce or steak frites with aioli.

To keep my diet on track, I make lists and plan my meals in advance whenever possible. Unlike most Voracious Carnivores, I do a lot of my recipe planning and grocery shopping in advance on my smart phone. However, like my fellow Voracious Carnivores, I have go-to recipes that I use frequently. Despite my routines, I appreciate stores that offer a variety of products in the meat case. I also like stores that value my loyalty and reward it with exclusive promotions or discounts because it helps me keep meat a part of my weekly meals.

Want to know what type of meat consumer segment you’re a part of? Download the FREE Meat Consumer Segmentation Executive Summary to learn more about Voracious Carnivores and its five consumer segment counterparts today!

The Selective Foodies Party

Gibson and Scout out on the town

Coca-Cola. Team Fitz. Vinegar-based BBQ sauce. Dog lover. Millennial.

Thanks to the Meat Consumer Segmentation research study, I can now add a new label to my list: Selective Foodie.

In December of 2016, Midan surveyed 2,200 meat eaters to better understand attitudes and behaviors surrounding meat purchasing and preparation. The results yielded six distinct segments of meat consumers, for which we created unique profiles to illustrate a multi-dimensional view of purchase drivers and shopping habits.

I’m a member of the smallest meat consumer segment, but what we lack in numbers, we make up for in passion! It’s never just about putting food on the table – it’s about finding the perfect recipe, crafting a complete grocery list, preparing with love (and wine) and enjoying a home-cooked meal with the fam. It’s about the experience.

If you’re hoping to appeal to Selective Foodies like me here are the two biggest ways to do so:

Build Your Brand

Because we’re a family-oriented group who values quality over price, we want to buy products we can depend on, and our devotion to national brands accomplishes that. I didn’t realize what a brand loyalist I was until my rehearsal dinner, when two of my college roommates gave my groom tips for living with me. Making the list was the need to always purchase Aveeno skin products. What can I say…they smell good!

This is also where my Millennial-ism starts showing. My generation likes finding brands they can believe in, like Endangered Species Chocolate, which does a pretty sweet job of turning cravings into philanthropy. What does your brand stand for? What’s your brand story? What are people saying about your brand? If you aren’t asking these questions, now’s the time – because Selective Foodies already are.

Sell the Experience

From community-style seating to farm-to-table décor, the restaurant industry has a strong handle on how to create an interesting dining experience that makes a perfect backdrop for Instagram posts. But a foodie is not exclusively defined by their attraction to trendy restaurants or the hottest new ingredient – again, it’s about the experience.

The Selective Foodies segment indexes high in the South, which comes as no surprise, because if there’s one thing we love in the South, it’s a story – and what’s a story without an experience? If you can illustrate what kind of experience your products offer, whether it’s a nostalgic holiday feast or lively Memorial Day bash, then you’ll get those storytelling wheels turning.

Like I said – it’s never just about putting food on the table. It’s about birthday burgers and a Panthers half-time on the half-shell. It’s watching Friday Night Lights with brisket and Shiner, because “Texas Forever.” It’s brunch with girlfriends and Ben & Jerry’s with my husband.

I could go on and on, but now I’m hungry and want to plan a party.

This Wavering Budgeteer Doesn’t Waver on a Good Deal

Diana and her Voracious Carnivore, Jeff.

My name is Diana Patulak Ross and I am the new proofreader at Midan Marketing. I am also new to the meat world (my background is in journalism, not meat!), so I was excited to attend our recent Meat Consumer Segmentation webinar. I was fascinated by the various meat consumer segments and curious to see which one I fit.

When it comes to shopping I am very thrifty so I wasn’t surprised to learn that I fall into the Wavering Budgeteer segment. The research was spot on!

Being a former newspaper reporter, I still love the smell of a hard copy newspaper so I go through the Sunday paper and circulars for coupons and store advertisements. After doing my research I know which stores have the best prices on meats and I am not afraid to travel to more than one to capture a good deal.

Since the Meat Consumer Segmentation profile so perfectly pegged me, I read the entire study so I could figure out where my husband landed. He is a Voracious Carnivore. (I guessed that one also.) Growing up in America’s heartland he was brought up on meat and corn so those items play a big part in our weekly meal plan.

So I make my list before I leave the house and once at the store look for in-store promotions that satisfy my budget while appealing to his love of prime rib. Marriage and meal planning are both a balancing act, right?

At the store I pay attention to in-store promotions as I like trying something new but am often deterred by price. A promotion or coupon gets my attention and will often make the difference between whether I purchase the item or not. Here’s where the “wavering” part of the segment comes in: if I’m on the fence, offering me a deal helps me pull the trigger!

I take the time to read product labels so learning about new recipes or reinforcing the importance of good nutrition will often lead me to purchase the product even though it wasn’t on my original list. Getting added value for my money is another way to capture my meat dollars.

Want to know the best way to market to money-conscious Wavering Budgeteers? Those of us in this segment want to feel we are getting a great deal on a purchase. So mailing coupons or printing them in the local paper will bring us in while point-of-sale promotions, especially ones that provide product information as well as good pricing, will lead us to buy.

I enjoyed learning about where I fit into meat consumer segmentation and look forward to nosing around into some of the other segments. Hopefully my training as a reporter and my Wavering Budgeteer personality will help me sniff out a story and a good deal or two.

I’m a Premium Player. What About You?

haley-frazierWhen it comes to my shopping habits, I have always been one to know exactly what I need. I am big on making lists and hate going out of my way to make my purchases.

Hello, my name is Haley Frazier and I am a Digital Content Coordinator at Midan Marketing. But I recently found out I am also a Premium Player.

I am referring to one of the six consumer segments Midan developed from our Meat Consumer Segmentation study. We conducted research to learn more about the different types of meat consumers in the U.S. today.

I am a millennial, but don’t let my age fool you—I pay for the meat I want because I care about having quality food! That’s one of the key characteristics of a Premium Player.

Ready to learn about this Premium Player’s habits?

Saturday morning: start meal planning for the week. The first thing I do is pull out my phone and search Yummly for dinner ideas. (For you non-millennials out there, Yummly is a recipe app that provides recommendations based on your personal preference.) I like trying different recipes with fun flavors, but I tend to stick with the same meats. Once the menu is complete and the shopping list is put together, I don’t grab my keys and head to my local grocery store; instead, I grab my laptop to order my groceries online! “Okay Google, let’s go shopping!” (I love using my voice-activated assistant.)

Ordering groceries online is rather new to me, but it’s awesome. I don’t have to squeeze my way through the narrow aisles or wait in the long lines on an early Saturday morning.

After ordering all of my produce, I click over to the butcher department. When I buy my meat, I don’t focus on prices as much as I do the labels/packaging. I care about the health attributes…is it all-natural, antibiotic-free and, if I’m being honest, does the packaging appeal to me? (I like a package that looks fresh and healthy.) To me, having quality meat at every meal is important, but at times, I’m okay trying a lighter meal with a non-meat protein.

Once I finish ordering my groceries, I select the time that I am able to pick them up. When I get home and I start putting them away, I don’t think twice about putting my meat in the freezer. I know I won’t eat it fast enough and to me, freezing my meat doesn’t take away from the taste.

So how do you market to a millennial Premium Player like me? Start focusing on online shopping. Think of ways you can make your packaging not just appealing in the store, but also online. Highlight the health attributes of your meat, share various ways you can prepare the meat or offer multiple flavor options that will inspire me to add to my routine meat purchases.

Saturday evening: make a delicious meal, curl up on the couch with my cat and binge watch Netflix for the next four hours. (See, I really am a millennial!) 😉

Learn more about Premium Players and the other five meat consumer segments by downloading our free Meat Consumer Segmentation Executive Summary.

If you’d like to chat about the research, please contact Maggie O’Quinn, our New Business Development Director.

Five Opportunities to Sell More Fresh Meat

sell-more-fresh-meatAt Midan, our Market Research Team is always scoping out the consumer trends that are having the biggest impact on the meat industry. A key part of our job is to help our clients understand the implications those trends can have on their business. By assigning meaning to facts and figures, we can help turn meat trends into opportunities.

So what opportunities should be on your radar? I’ve outlined five that you might find helpful as you jump into the new year:

  • Embrace Multi-Generations and Multi-Ethnicities
    If you pay attention to the media, you might think that Millennials are the only consumers shopping the meat case. I’m joking, of course – today’s broad and deep consumer base actually spans various cultures and generations and brings with it a range of differing values and habits.  There are four primary consumer segments affecting meat consumption trends: Millennials, Boomers, Hispanics and Asian-Americans. Members of these groups are actively influencing how fresh meat is prepared and consumed in the U.S. It’s critical to tune into the preferences and tastes of these key players so you can adjust your branding, marketing and communication efforts accordingly.

     
    Meet today’s top 4 consumer groups.

  • Promote Transparency Over Traceability
    Significant numbers of consumers value full disclosure over trace back – they’re more concerned that companies are transparent about their production practices when it comes to meat and poultry, versus exact tracking. In the 2016 Power of Meat study,  90 percent of consumers indicated a strong desire to know where their meat comes from, while only 68 percent were interested in tracing meat back to specific animals. Consumers want to know things like: Have hormones or antibiotics been used? What ingredients have been added?Are your production practices an open book when it comes to this kind of information? Being transparent is one of the fastest ways to build trust with consumers.
  • Own Protein and Other Meat Nutrients
    The meat industry has always had the best protein story, hands down. The trouble is, we aren’t telling it effectively. We are competing with yogurt and other foods on the protein battlefront when we should be the automatic victor. According to our Protein and the Plate research (conducted jointly with Meatingplace and sponsored by Yerecic Label), 70 percent of consumers said they substitute non-meat protein for fresh meat once a week.
    Unless it’s okay with you that close to three-quarters of consumers are replacing meat for at least one meal a week, we need to up our game. One way to combat this kind of substitution is to get back to the basics with consumers by reminding them that meat is one of the best protein sources on the planet as well as an excellent source of other key nutrients. We know that consumers love a good story, and we need to be telling ours.

     
    Read Danette Amstein’s blog: Resolve to Own Protein

  • Develop Value-Added Products
    Value-added items in the meat case are experiencing strong growth and there are several reasons why. Along with offering reduced preparation time and minimizing the decision-making process, these products can be sold in packages of one, two or multiple servings. More than ever, consumers crave convenience and simplicity, and the variety of package sizes meets the needs of smaller households, like Boomers. And for that younger generation that’s less educated about meat, value-added products help make dinner stress-free. It’s all about offering meal solutions that meet the needs of your consumer base.

     
    See how we helped develop the Tyson Crafted Creations brand.

  • Build Meat Brands
    You’ve heard it here before and are no doubt seeing it in our industry: commodity products are making way for branded products. Along with helping you compete in the meat case, branding is a way for you to attract new customers and generate loyalty. Branding helps build trust and a solid relationship with your company. Although the meat industry tends to be slow to change, this trend is picking up speed fast, so the time to act is now.

     
    Get meat branding tips.

Are any of these trends on your radar? Please leave a comment; I’d love to hear your feedback!

My head says OK, my budget says no way…

So you’re thinking about conducting consumer research, but you haven’t pulled the trigger.

You are not alone. As consumer research specialists, we’ve found that many clients have trouble making the leap from considering consumer research to actually doing it. Often, the stumbling block is cost. If you aren’t saying it out loud, you are probably thinking it, “How much did you say this research will cost? That’s more than the price of going to market! We can’t possibly afford that, just forget it.

While you might feel some sticker shock initially, consider the long-term value of the information you can glean about your customers by surveying them. The reality is that without making some investment to talk with and listen to your target audience, you could be missing a huge opportunity.

What can consumer research do for you?

Research sheds the kind of light on consumer behavior that can keep you from blindly taking risks that lead to failure. Customers can make or break a business, so understanding what matters to them is vital. Let their way of thinking guide you. Consumer research can help you:

  • determine market demand for a new product and confirm whether consumers have a real need for what you’re offering.
  • gain insights about a target group about whom you have little or no understanding.
  • gather feedback about new concepts that you are interested in pursuing, so that you can modify your plans or switch gears before it is too late.
  • assess the impact of marketing on product sales at the store level, before a national roll-out.

Make consumer research work for you

Consumers can’t make decisions for your business, but the insights that come from surveying them can help you make informed decisions that have a critical impact on your business.

According to Rich Thoma, vice president of sales and marketing for Yerecic Label, conducting consumer research was one of the smartest decisions his company made for their marketing programs. “Taking new products to market that are supported by consumer research not only brings validity to our products, but also increases our access to potential clients who are hungry to hear from consumers,” says Thoma.

Thoughtfully-conducted consumer research can generate real results, like increased sales. MilkPEP studied consumer reactions to the positioning concept for a new program to increase milk usage, Latte Love, which ultimately drove a 1% increase in milk volume sales. Progresso Soup used consumer research to determine its competitive advantage over other soup brands among the Hispanic population, which lead to targeted messaging that increased both dollar volume and Hispanic-specific dollar volume.

Consumers are not only our targets; they are incredible resources for our industry. Making the investment in consumer research gives you a wealth of knowledge that can translate to real dollars and cents. So if you want to know what consumers think, it’s worth it to ask.

If you’d like to learn more about talking to consumers, please contact Mary Pat Anders at m.anders@midanmarketing.com.

Develop a High Performing Online Ad

As the Advertising Coordinator at Midan, I develop advertising schedules for our clients each year. Through my years of experience, I’ve put together some useful tips for online advertising.  First you must ask one of the most important questions in advertising:  “who is the target?” In order to effectively market, you must know your audience.  The following tips will help you develop a successful online advertising campaign.

Know your target
An advertising campaign will not be successful without knowing your target. Become familiar with your target – know their age, ethnicity, geographic location, habits, behaviors, likes, dislikes, etc.  Ask questions like:

  1. What online publications does the target read?
  2. How frequently do they read them?
  3. Do they participate in social media?
  4. What “language” do they speak?

Do your research
Reach out to potential publications and ask questions to better understand who they are reaching. Here are a few questions to get you started:

  1. What is the best performing ad space?
  2. What day has the highest performing ads?
  3. What is their online editorial calendar?

Develop compelling creative
Develop compelling creative that speaks to your audience.  Ads should always include a call-to-action; a strong one gets clicks, which is important if you want your target to learn more about the product or service you are offering.

The imagery is the first thing people notice. Use strong visuals that relate to your product. Bold, bright, clear images will have a positive impact on your click-through-rate (CTR).

Make sure your ads are linking to appropriate landing pages. If your ad is talking about “Product A” and you’re linking them to “Product B,” there will be a disconnect.

Test your creative
Developing ad variations is a good way to test different messages or images that speak to your audience. It’s important to refine your ads when something isn’t working, in order to achieve the best results.
Here are some variations you can try:

  1. Test various call-to-actions (i.e. Click Here, Try Now)
  2. Test words that speak to your audience (i.e. Free, New, Exclusive)
  3. Test people and product images

Measure your results
Request an online advertising report from the publications after each campaign. Compare this report to the traffic on your landing page. These reports will reveal the value of your campaign. It’s also helpful to know the publications’ average CTR of the space you advertised in so you can compare your ads performance to the average.

Track what works and what doesn’t. Don’t be afraid to try something new. Rotating creative is essential to keeping your audience engaged and making your campaign more effective. I hope these tips will help you develop a successful online advertising campaign.

 

Kristy Finley, Advertising Coordinator
Also known as the “Photo Shoot Coordinator Extraordinaire”, Kristy is responsible for ad placements in trade publications and online.  She helps to make sure every detail is perfect in our mouth-watering, professional meat photography.

Point of View: Millennials

By Rebecca Riddle, Jr. Art Director


I am a Millennial. One of 80 million. The generation born between 1980-2000, Millennials compose the largest generation in American history. Yes, we are larger than the Baby Boomers. In three years, we’re forecasted to outspend them. We may not be your target audience now, but soon, we might be your bread and butter. Are you making an effort to reach us?

We look very different from previous generations. Only 60% of us are white. For many older Americans, this statistic is uncomfortable, but for Millennials, this diversity is normal. Race isn’t a big issue for us. A fellow Millennial Jess Rainer describes this view in his book The Millennials, “We know racism still exists. We know injustices still take place. But our world is so different from the world of the Baby Boomers. When I read about the racism and the Civil Rights Movement, particularly in the 1960s, it seems so distant.” He continues, “For us ethnic diversity is normative… [We] rarely describe someone first by their skin color or by their ethnic origin.”

We are a diverse group within ourselves. No stereotypical Millennial exists. However, common themes have impacted large segments of us. One such theme is the idea of making a difference. Jess and Thom Rainer’s research found that “nine out of 10 Millennials believe it is their responsibility to make a difference in the world.” Whereas Baby Boomers were “self-absorbed and narcissistic…three out of four Millennials believe it is their role in life to serve others.” The idea of “paying it forward” has made impact on us. We want to live great lives, not in terms of wealth, fame or power, but in terms of making a great difference. As the largest generation in American history, we have the power to do so.

The grocery store will soon feel our impact. Jefferies and Alix Partners has a study called “Trouble in Aisle 5” that signals the challenges and opportunities grocers will face as their main audience transitions to Millennials.  One transition point is the appreciation of diversity in food. Millennials are “much more willing to try different types of cuisines.” Since most Millennials consider ethnic diversity as normal, our willingness to try different ethnic foods is a natural expression of ourselves.

A lot of research is being done to accurately understand Millennials. Get to know us. What you find may surprise you!

If you’d like to learn more from “Trouble in Aisle 5,” the entire report is posted here.

If you’d like to read more from Jess and Thom Rainer’s book, you can find it here.

Rebecca Riddle, Jr. Art Director
For over a year, Rebecca has been helping to make Midan and its client look good.  She lends her graphic design skills to a range of print, online advertising and digital marketing projects. 

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