Groceries delivered to my door?
Sign me up!

I’ll admit it. The thought of trading in the grocery store checkout line for an online cart to buy my weekly groceries puts a little spring in my step. I appreciate that I am heavily involved in the meat industry and have a deep love for brick and mortar stores, but the promise of groceries delivered to my front door intrigued me enough to try it out.

Online grocery is one of the great comeback stories. After the first online grocery delivery company Homegrocer.com failed during the dot-com bust of the 2000s, smart business people perfected the formula and they have returned stronger, more diverse and with better IPOs than ever before. Online grocers like AmazonFresh.com, FreshDirect.com and DoortoDoorOrganics.com are skipping brick and mortar stores for a strong online presence with regionally-based distribution warehouses and privately-owned delivery trucks. In 2014 IBIS World reported that online grocery sales had grown at a 14.1% annual rate over the past five years. In addition, profit estimates were $927 million, which is 8.5% of total revenue. For comparison, brick and mortar stores are at an average of 1.3% total revenue (FMI). Online grocery is only growing, with 54% of online grocery shoppers increasing their spending over the past year (Watson, 2015).

What does this mean for the meat industry?

For the right grocery shopper, online grocery can be a life saver. While it truly has the potential to replace or at least fill in the gaps of a regular grocery shopping trip (and that even goes for fresh meat sales), there is a price for convenience. From my estimates, an online shopper will pay more, but in the long run it’s an opportunity cost comparison. If the time saved by shopping online versus going to a brick and mortar store is greater, shoppers will increasingly make the switch. For meat suppliers, that means playing the game and working to create fruitful relationships with online grocery businesses. However, when trying to forge the sale, it will be important to have a good grasp of an online grocery’s unique buying, selling and distribution business model.

In order for brick and mortar grocery stores to compete, Meat Directors or Meat Managers need to constantly be giving consumers a reason to physically come into a store. That means emphasizing convenience, value and product freshness, along with unique advertising campaigns to peak and maintain a customer’s interest. Some retailers have been successful with a hybrid model that allows customers to order online and pick up bagged and ready to go groceries at the store’s front door. While this does require a bit of infrastructure and systems in place on behalf of the retailer to succeed, it also may require meat suppliers to produce specialty cuts or packaging for the retailer.

Who’s the customer?

I am the epitome of an online grocery consumer target. About five years ago — otherwise known as B.C. (before child) — I was a busy professional single whose clean refrigerator held nothing more than a half-gallon of skim milk and a few premium steaks in the freezer. Now I am a busy professional mom who can barely squeeze two gallons of whole milk, several frozen ground beef chubs and an entire pork loin into my over-stuffed refrigerator.

In either case, trips to the grocery store have always been a burden. Since I was often in grocery stores for professional reasons at the start of my career, I could find a thousand alternate things to do than hit the local grocer for personal items, and now it’s often comical to watch my 2-year-old’s grubby fingers pull random items off the shelves. Voila! Enter my reason for trying online grocery with front- door delivery.

Because I have a self-diagnosed obsession with online reviews, I have compared and contrasted three major online groceries in that format. Since only a few online grocers deliver to my region in Kansas City, I roped some friends into receiving packages on my behalf with the promise of free steak. Each is a potential online grocery customer as well: a busy professional single and a busy professional mom.

Let’s dig in!

The Basics
amazonfresh-logo-190915_150px

AmazonFresh.com4stars

Locations served:
New York City, New Jersey, Philadelphia, Southern California, Northern California and Seattle

Who got the delivery:
My high- powered single friend in San Diego

Fresh-Direct_150pxFreshDirect.com

3stars

Locations served:
New York City, New Jersey, Philadelphia and areas of Delaware and Connecticut

Who got the delivery:
My cousin, the busy professional and mom of two

door-to-door_150pxDoortoDoorOrganics.com

3stars

Locations served:
parts of Colorado, Kansas City, Chicago, Michigan and parts of the NE

Who got the delivery:
Me, the meat industry professional and mom

Ease in Online Ordering
5stars

I’ll be honest. I love shopping on Amazon.com! I read all the customer reviews, I religiously use the sorting capabilities and I even get excited over the “frequently bought together” suggestions. So when I had the opportunity to buy groceries in the same way, I was excited! Aside from forcing an available delivery zip code in order to browse items, AmazonFresh.com’s online ordering lived up to the hype and more!

3stars

FreshDirect’s online ordering was antiquated at best. Their online ordering mirrors that of an actual brick and mortar store with categorizations, cross merchandising and a large number of offerings, but their system does not have nearly the bells and whistles as other websites. The scheduling system was a bit confusing, and their check-out process seemed to take forever. Overall, they are due for an upgrade.

5stars

DoortoDoor organics online ordering was designed with the consumer in mind. Their website is truly beautiful, and their advance categorizations and enticing photography elevate the overall feel. They also have quick reference icons communicating various brand attributes along with a one click Shop By Recipe® function! Whoever designed their website knew how to appeal to consumers.

Pricing and Offering
2stars

AmazonFresh.com relies on suppliers to set actual product pricing, and for the offered regional and specialty brands, the pricing seemed in line with what they would normally cost at a brick and mortar store. The prohibitive costs are the incremental ones. There is a $299 annual signup fee for a PrimeFresh membership and a minimum $50 subtotal just to get the first delivery.

4stars

Pricing for FreshDirect is slightly more than what would be found in a brick and mortar store, but still not out of reach. They do not have a minimum order requirement but instead charge a flat fee of $7.99 for deliveries. There is an optional DeliveryPassSM subscription which is a maximum of $119/year with a minimum order of $30. I’m intrigued!

3stars

Because DoortoDoorOrganics is a hybrid subscription meal planner and online grocery, to get a delivery you must be subscribed to a “Produce Box,” which start at $25.99. Once you’re subscribed, you can shop the store, but be forewarned – all items are either organic or natural, and inherently pricey.

 

Delivery and Packaging
5stars

Among many things AmazonFresh does right, their delivery and packaging is on point! They make marketing magic with branded green delivery trucks, matching cooler bags and branded freezer packs. Refrigerated items even have special quick teardown Styrofoam sides that help protect deliveries from the hot sun. The beef items themselves were delivered frozen in wax paper wrapping, which made the steaks have a “local butcher” feel. This was definitely a nice selling point.

1star

On the plus side, FreshDirect delivery was perfectly timed; however, their packaging was less than desirable. The steaks were in traditional overwrap packaging, but then just thrown into a large cardboard box with no protection or way to keep the product cool, especially in the summer. The promise of convenience dissipates if a customer has to be home to receive his/her groceries.

3stars

First off, delivery was on time as promised; however, the packaging was way over done. There was literally enough padding and freezer packs to safely ship a delicate icicle to the Sahara and have it arrive safely. It is important to note that there was communication printed on the packing asking recipients to set everything out during normal delivery days so it could be returned and reused. Trouble is, not all customers will do that, which leaves their “better for the earth” vibe an empty promise.

 

What’s the final word?

In the long run I do not believe online grocery will replace the brick and mortar store completely, but it certainly has the potential to steal share from the U.S. grocery market as a whole.

What are your thoughts about online grocery? Tell us in the comments below.

 


 

IBIS World. (2014, December). Online Grocery Sales in the US: Market Research Report. Retrieved July 24, 2015, from IBIS World: http://www.ibisworld.com/industry/online-grocery-sales.html

FMI. (n.d.). Supermarket Facts. Retrieved July 23, 2015, from Research Resources: http://www.fmi.org/research-resources/supermarket-facts

Watson, E. (2015, July 7). Online grocery shippers are upping their spending online, but remain wary of buying fresh produce, says new survey. Retrieved July 23, 2015, from FoodNavigator-USA.com: http://www.foodnavigator-usa.com/Markets/Online-grocery-shoppers-are-upping-their-spending-online-survey

 

Resolve to Own Protein in 2016

It’s easy to guess what the top New Year’s resolutions are every January:  lose weight, get in shape, eat better, right?  (Raise your hand if you’ve picked one of these.)

The start of a new year,shutterstock_334226393 when people enthusiastically resolve to focus on their health and wellness, is a great time to be in the fresh meat industry. In order to capitalize on all the ways that meat can help the health-conscious achieve their goals, it’s important to understand two key factors challenging today’s meat consumption.

Fad Diets are Trending Down

Although the new year is the perfect time to promote lean meat to help build muscle and lose fat, interest in high-protein diets like the Paleolithic Diet appears to be fading. According to Google Trends, online searches for “Paleolithic Diet,” “Primal Diet” and other high-protein diets have been dropping significantly since 2013, reaching an all-time low in 2015. Plant-based diets, however, appear to be on the rise.

So, all those folks who were flocking to the meat case for their high-protein fix aren’t so much these days. But while high-protein diets might be losing their appeal, balanced diets are always in style. So while you might not get as many Caveman dieters, you can still lure lots of folks who are trying to eat well and maintain a healthy weight. Lean beef and pork deliver the high-quality protein every body needs all year long. We in the meat industry need to make sure consumers understand this.

Alternate Protein Sources aren’t Slowing Down

While Americans might be fickle about their fad diets, their love affair with protein seems to be going strong. Unfortunately for the meat industry, people are often choosing their protein in the dairy case instead of the meat case. The current Greek yogurt craze is just one example. Many consumers have shifted away from meat in the past year. According to our Protein and the Plate research:

  • 70% of consumers said they substitute non-meat protein for fresh meat once a week
  • 20% of meat eaters said they are replacing fresh meat more often than they did a year ago

While consumers have an increased awareness of the importance of protein, they aren’t always turning to one of the best sources on the planet to get it. I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: the meat industry needs to OWN protein!  We are missing out if we don’t shout it from the rooftops and plaster it on the package and all marketing materials.

Fresh Meat:  The Perfect Diet Food

Let’s face it:  those gung-ho consumers with their New Year’s resolutions might not make it to the gym as often as they like (myself included), but there’s little doubt they’ll get to the grocery store. Be ready with products and messaging that help them start the new year on the right foot, with the right protein:  fresh meat.

The time is now to communicate how fresh meat is the ideal protein source for a healthy, balanced diet. Be sure your websites and social media posts are talking about it and start planning now to get this important messaging in store and on packages.

Check out these “Protein Builds” videos from Maple Leaf Foods that effectively relay the importance of protein in a healthy diet.

Leave a comment or email me directly at d.amstein@midanmarketing.com.  I love to hear from you!

2015 Recap: Pay attention to these 3 things

When the calendar hits December 1, it’s time to start checking to see if we made the “nice” list or not! (I have confirmed my status…how about you!?!)  As 2015 comes to a close, we also pause to reflect on the significant events that have shaped our industry this year, and consider how they might impact 2016.   As I look back across the major headlines from the past year, three main themes seem to form:

  1. Prices/Supply – Oh, what a roller coaster ride 2015 has been! Beef prices found new ceilings, pork prices leveled out before taking a nose dive the last few weeks. Was any topic more talked about in the media and meat company board rooms across the country this past year?  The good news is that 2016 is bringing greener pastures, literally, thanks to much-needed rain, so more cows are being retained.  Pork producers are also breathing a sigh of relief that the PEDv outbreak is behind them.  The conditions are ripe for increases in supply with less volatile pricing, and that is something we can all be thankful for!
  1. Niches – We live in a world where specialization is becoming the norm, not the exception, and this trend has resulted in niche meat brands and products that cater to specific lifestyle and dietary needs. For some consumers, antibiotic-free is a trigger; for others, it’s animal welfare. We stopped selling one-size-fits-all meat a while ago, and in 2015 we saw further fragmentation. It will serve us well to figure out which niches are feasible to cater to and then build the brands and products to meet those needs.
  1. Health/Wellness – 2015 brought its share of headlines that tied meat with health, like whether lean meat would still be part of the Dietary Guidelines or the IARC’s report that processed meat causes cancer. But when we’re talking about meat and health, let’s not forget protein. “Protein” is a word we have to continue fighting to own. Meat is the ultimate source of protein, and if you are not calling that out in your consumer messaging, it is time to get on the bandwagon.

As we wrap up 201shutterstock_328379666 (1)5, I encourage you to spend a few minutes thinking of the ramifications of these themes.  In order for us to succeed in 2016, we have to keep our pulse on what consumers are doing and what is influencing their behaviors.  What do you think?  Do you agree with my assessment or did I miss something?  What do you think the main headlines will be in 2016?  I always appreciate your comments.

Cheers to 2016!

Meat is the Bad Guy…Again

Even before the official report on whether red meat would be classified as a carcinogen was released by the IARC, I was approached by a fellow mom on the soccer field this weekend.   Knowing that I work in the meat industry, she hit me with, “So I hear meat causes cancer!”

And so it begins… again.  According to Meatingplace, “The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), the cancer agency of the World Health Organization, has concluded that processed meat is carcinogenic to humans and that red meat is probably carcinogenic to humans.”

It doesn’t take long for the media to shorten that finding into the kind of inflammatory headline I heard on the soccer sideline.   No matter that the IARC reviewed a total of 940 agents for their potential to cause cancer:  the only one getting any attention is red meat.  (Other potential cancer-causing agents, according to the IARC’s report, include air and sun – really.)

Meat, as usual, continues to be an easy target. So whether you’re a packer, processor, retailer or allied industry supplier, you’re likely to face questions about these findings like I have.  This is a prime opportunity to review the scientific data in our arsenal that helps promote red meat’s excellent nutritional value.

The industry response thus far has been swift and smart, with both NAMI and NCBA weighing in with comments that give much-needed perspective on and context to the rulings.  A Q&A document presented by the IARC that delves deeper into the report also notes that their cancer-causing classifications don’t assess the level of risk, a critical point in the discussion that is often lost in the media frenzy.

To help you fight the provocative headlines closer to home, we’ve pulled together a few resources you can review to educate yourself, your customers, your consumers, and maybe even the woman sitting next to you at your kid’s soccer game.

Risk Bites Video: What does “Probably Cause Cancer” actually mean?

Meatingplace:  IARC issues carcinogen ratings on processed, red meat

Meatingplace:  Parsing the IARC ruling on meat and cancer; it’s complicated

Meatingplace Issues Story:  The Next Cut

7 Things to Consider for 2016 Planning

It’s that time of year again:  college football season!  And while I am all about watching my beloved K-State Wildcats, this season also signals a key period for meat industry professionals:  planning time.  That means careful analysis of historical sales data along with a watchful eye on emerging consumer trends.  To help you think about where the industry is headed as you plan for 2016, we’ve put together seven tips that address the trends we think will have greatest impact on the coming year:

  1. Promote meat as the ultimate protein: Hello meat leaders, we need to be shouting this from the rooftops, on all packaging and POS and in every B2C ad!  Until we make a concerted effort to spell this message out to consumers, those pesky center-of-the store items boasting added protein will continue to steal our thunder. 2016 has to be the year when consumers can’t miss the message that meat is the best source for protein.  Learn more.
  1. Sell meat as an ingredient: While we in the industry like to think that thick steaks or chops still rule the center of the plate, today’s consumers think differently.  We have entered a new era where consumers are choosing cuts that can be mixed with other ingredients for convenience, flavor and budget reasons.  If you want to reach consumers where they are right now, provide meat in more ingredient-friendly ways.  Learn more.
  1. Focus on what your brand does best: Branded meat must fill a niche.  If your brand is trying to be everything to everyone, you dilute your message and end up with mediocre results.  Identify your target and put a laser focus on them.  It‘s okay to say “no” to a potential customer that wants you to change something about your brand.  In 2016, keep your brand messaging focused, engage your customers and consumers who fit your target and don’t detour.

2016 blog photo

  1. Explain what you do and why: Lately, it seems like everything we do in production agriculture is called into question. To counteract this, the meat industry must be transparent.  Consumers want the opportunity to understand why you do you what you do.  For years, we haven’t taken the time to explain our practices and by not doing so, we appear guilty of hiding something from the public.  If you want to silence our very-vocal critics, make 2016 the year that your back story is prominently featured on your website and promoted on your social media channels.
  1. Reconsider your packaging: The Boomers have fewer people to feed each night and the Millennials rarely sit down at the table.  This creates a conundrum with our conventional packaging.  We need case-ready single portion steaks and chops to meet the needs of both groups. Demographics don’t lie:  the make-up of our population is changing, and your packaging must change to reflect this. Take a hard look at your packaging in 2016 and make it more consumer-friendly.
  1. Give consumers the convenience they crave: Boomers are busy filling their new-found free time outside the kitchen and most Millennials don’t know how to cook if it doesn’t go into the microwave.  We have to make the end goal of a great-tasting meal easier.  As your plan for 2016, include R&D dollars to find more value-added options to meet this consumer need.
  1. Explore your export potential: If you are not getting serious about the export potential for your branded meat programs, you are missing the boat (yep, pun intended here).  The global middle class is growing by leaps and bounds, with most of the growth taking place in Asia.  With discretionary spending comes the desire for premium offerings.  In 2016, create opportunities for your branded programs outside the U.S. by telling your story and engaging these quality-hungry consumers.

Agree? Disagree?  Leave me a comment or email me your thoughts.  I always enjoy hearing from you!

I hope your planning season is wrapped up well ahead of the college football bowl games.  I plan to be planted on the couch, wearing purple and cheering on my Wildcats!

UPDATE:  2017 Planning Blog now available

Meat is Mixing Things Up

“Meat and potatoes.”

What do you think of when you read that? It used to mean dinner: a big plate of red meat with mashed potatoes beside it and gravy poured all over it. Yummm!  In today’s world the saying has taken on a slightly different meaning.  It seems to be more about being “down-to-earth” or fundamentally basic, e.g. “He’s such a ‘meat and potatoes’ kind of guy.”

Dinner is no longer what comes to mind when people hear that phrase, and Midan recently uncovered one of the key reasons why.

Through our Protein and the Plate research (conducted jointly with Meatingplace and sponsored by Yerecic Label), we learned that up until 2014, annual eatings per capita where meat was at the center of the plate covered around 45 and annual eatings per capita where meat was an ingredient hung out at around 43 eatings. In 2014, these numbers switched places. For the first time, the long-standing practice of a juicy hunk of meat owning the center of the plate and anchoring the meal was replaced with that meat being cut up – chunked, diced, sliced or ground – and combined with other ingredients before being served up on dinner plates.

This is HUGE! See for yourself.

Although we in the meat industry pride ourselves on selling big hunks of meat to consumers, we must understand that while our target audience may still buy those hunks, there has been a seismic shift in meat usage. This comes as a result of increased beef prices and the unfortunate but common perception that preparing meat can be difficult and time-consuming. For many consumers, the answer to these challenges has been to cut back on the amount being purchased and serve it in a taco shell with lettuce and salsa. Boom!  Easy, quick and more affordable.

In addition to tacos, other popular ways consumers have incorporated meat as an ingredient are in pasta, soups/stews, burgers/sandwiches, burritos, casseroles,  stir fry…and the list goes on and on…

So rather than pushing consumers back to the days of rolling up sleeves and pulling a hefty roast out of the oven (because, quite frankly, they don’t want to), the meat industry must embrace this shift. Here are four things we need to do:

  1. Innovative Products

Go beyond stew meat and prepared kabobs and think of new products that can be used as ingredients. Look at how consumers are using different cuts of meat and make them recipe-ready. Convenience is key, so find ways to save time for the meal preparer.

  1. Innovative Packaging

Explore new ways to package fresh meat for multiple cooking methods, whether for the grill, slow cooker, stovetop, etc. and figure out how to cut whole muscle into smaller cuts for center of the plate and ingredient use. We have got to offer individual and smaller portions because that is what consumers want.

  1. Different Merchandising

It’s time to ramp up the integration of education into promotion. It’s time to connect the dots for the customers shopping at the meat case by providing meat in the most common weights needed for recipes and in the form those recipes call for. It is time to push the departmental barriers of merchandising aside and truly cross-merchandise with products that are likely to be used in meat -as-an-ingredient meals:  noodles for casseroles, lettuce for salads, tortilla shells for tacos.

  1. Broad Messaging

The days of telling the meat story just at the meat case are over. We have to collectively work to inform/educate consumers on the value of meat in their diets before they walk in the store. Meat companies have to be social! So get active on the social sphere and target your key customers where they are. It always comes back to catering to the consumer!!

 If we want to keep fresh meat on the plate, the meat industry must embrace the new meaning of “meat and potatoes” and provide consumers with the fundamentally basic options they are seeking at the meat case.

I’d love to hear your thoughts – please share your comments below!

3 Things to Consider for FY 2015 Planning

It’s always interesting to me how consumer trends across the board shape what happens in the meat case. As you plan for FY 2015, here are three trends that you should consider:

  1. Capitalize on the Protein Craze

A walk down any center grocery aisle will tell you that protein is one of the hottest buzzwords right now. It’s as if the rest of the world just figured out what we’ve known all along:  protein is a big deal. Everything from cereal to pasta now boasts added protein, and consumers are gobbling it up. This trend means good things for the meat industry — we have a lock on protein!  Not only is meat an excellent source of naturally-occurring protein, it tastes great. Would you rather get 23 grams of protein from a nice juicy Strip Steak, or 11 grams from a bowl of Cheerios™ Protein?

The message consumers need to hear is this:  look no further than the meat case for protein-rich, nutritious food.

Other nutrition topics we need to pay attention to include recent challenges to established USDA guidelines on fat intake. Headlines are swirling that saturated fat, long considered to be a diet no-no, might not be so bad after all. Consumers who have been restricting their fat consumption might now consider coming back to the meat case. You need to be ready for them, and loudly proclaim the incredible value of protein-rich, flavorful meat.

Read more:

Last 50 years of diet advice on meat, saturated fat could be wrong

Low-carb trumps low-fat for weight loss and cardiovascular risk: study

High-protein diets linked to lower blood pressure: study

  1. Give Permission to Spend More

There’s no way around it:  beef prices are continuing to rise, and the price gap between beef and other proteins is widening. Current beef prices, already about 30% higher than 2013 levels, are expected to climb another 12% in 2015, while pork and poultry are expected to drop about 15% and 8%, respectively.*

For beef retailers, it’s no time to shrink. (Pun intended!) Instead of apologizing for the sticker shock, give your customers permission to splurge on what some have been cutting back on: beef.  According to Len Steiner, demand is one of the drivers of higher-than-expected prices.* For beef lovers, nothing satisfies like a tender, juicy steak, and sometimes all they need is a little nudge to get over that price hurdle.

Pork and poultry retailers, you should soon be sitting pretty. With those anticipated lower prices, you will be perfectly poised to develop messaging around being the most affordable protein choice.

Read more:

*Fat is in, changing meat economics: Steiner  

  1. Thin is In

Bigger beef carcasses are leading to even-higher-priced steaks. Savvy retailers already know that cutting primals into thinner cuts generates packages with more-appealing unit prices for customers. But have you thought about the across-the-board implications of thinner cuts?  Merchandising should include simple meal suggestions and shorter recommended cooking times to ensure a positive eating experience. Prominently feature recipes on your website that showcase thinner cuts and revised timings.

Another reason to pay special attention to thinner cuts is a shift in demand for portion sizes. Large segments of the population, particularly Millenials and Boomers, are now looking for smaller package sizes and smaller cuts. More than ever, you need to be aware of customers’ needs and evaluate your product mix and merchandising programs to meet those needs.

Read more:

Bigger Cattle; Smaller Steaks

What do you think?  What’s on your mind as you’re planning for FY 2015?  Please leave a comment below or feel free to contact me directly at d.amstein@midanmarketing.com.

Develop a High Performing Online Ad

As the Advertising Coordinator at Midan, I develop advertising schedules for our clients each year. Through my years of experience, I’ve put together some useful tips for online advertising.  First you must ask one of the most important questions in advertising:  “who is the target?” In order to effectively market, you must know your audience.  The following tips will help you develop a successful online advertising campaign.

Know your target
An advertising campaign will not be successful without knowing your target. Become familiar with your target – know their age, ethnicity, geographic location, habits, behaviors, likes, dislikes, etc.  Ask questions like:

  1. What online publications does the target read?
  2. How frequently do they read them?
  3. Do they participate in social media?
  4. What “language” do they speak?

Do your research
Reach out to potential publications and ask questions to better understand who they are reaching. Here are a few questions to get you started:

  1. What is the best performing ad space?
  2. What day has the highest performing ads?
  3. What is their online editorial calendar?

Develop compelling creative
Develop compelling creative that speaks to your audience.  Ads should always include a call-to-action; a strong one gets clicks, which is important if you want your target to learn more about the product or service you are offering.

The imagery is the first thing people notice. Use strong visuals that relate to your product. Bold, bright, clear images will have a positive impact on your click-through-rate (CTR).

Make sure your ads are linking to appropriate landing pages. If your ad is talking about “Product A” and you’re linking them to “Product B,” there will be a disconnect.

Test your creative
Developing ad variations is a good way to test different messages or images that speak to your audience. It’s important to refine your ads when something isn’t working, in order to achieve the best results.
Here are some variations you can try:

  1. Test various call-to-actions (i.e. Click Here, Try Now)
  2. Test words that speak to your audience (i.e. Free, New, Exclusive)
  3. Test people and product images

Measure your results
Request an online advertising report from the publications after each campaign. Compare this report to the traffic on your landing page. These reports will reveal the value of your campaign. It’s also helpful to know the publications’ average CTR of the space you advertised in so you can compare your ads performance to the average.

Track what works and what doesn’t. Don’t be afraid to try something new. Rotating creative is essential to keeping your audience engaged and making your campaign more effective. I hope these tips will help you develop a successful online advertising campaign.

 

Kristy Finley, Advertising Coordinator
Also known as the “Photo Shoot Coordinator Extraordinaire”, Kristy is responsible for ad placements in trade publications and online.  She helps to make sure every detail is perfect in our mouth-watering, professional meat photography.

My first few months at Midan

It’s been about four months since I started working at Midan Marketing. How could I have ever imagined working with a team of professionals who are not only extremely smart about meat and how to promote it, but are genuine, committed and an absolute pleasure to work with? Looks like I finally have my dream job!

I pretty much hit the ground running my first week at Midan. I got to dig in on a brand tracking study, getting the most value and quality for our client, keeping the details intact. A qualitative project was already underway so it was a new experience for me to understand a unique method for getting consumer feedback. At the end of the first few weeks, I have to admit the most fun I had was working on a proprietary Midan project called Manfluence, thinking about men grocery shopping and cooking! [Read more…]

Getting to the meat of the matter

Like most working women, my day starts early when the house is still quiet, giving me a few minutes to think through the numerous activities that will fill my day, plan for things I need to do and catch up on the news. I typically save the news for the last part of my morning ritual – not because it’s my favorite (it’s not), but because what I see and read, or the lack of it, often frustrates me. [Read more…]

photo-credit