Search Results for: social media

I know our brand needs to get in on this social media thing, BUT…

“It’s confusing.” “How do you know which pages to join?” “I DON’T KNOW WHAT I’M DOING!”

If this is how you feel about social media, I understand. Branching out into an unfamiliar area is scary, especially if you’re unsure about taking the next step. However, if you don’t take this step, you and your brand are going to be left behind.

It’s no secret that social media is on the cusp of world domination (I’m joking, of course). The role social media plays in our daily lives is a big one and its influence is growing. Social media provides avenues in gaining the attention of your audience that traditional mediums simply can’t deliver. With this being the case, it’s extremely important for brands to develop a solid social media strategy. With new tools and platforms constantly emerging, it’s easy to become overwhelmed with the entire social media process. However, with the right focus and attitude, creating your own “social space” can benefit your brand in ways you could never imagine. Here are a few things to consider when embarking on your social media journey:

1)      What is your objective? The best social media strategies have a goal in mind. For instance, do you want to drive sales, increase awareness, attract a following, etc.?

2)      Create engaging content. Think of social media as a two-way communication model. This is your opportunity to communicate directly with your audience and their opportunity to communicate with you. Post questions, surveys and other items that will elicit a response. In this moment, you have the attention of your audience; make good use of this opportunity.

3)      Respond in a timely manner. If a follower has taken the time to comment on a post, or send a private message, respond, and respond quickly! This is your chance to make a great first impression!

4)      Listen, Listen, Listen! Your audience will give you a good guide on what they want to see and learn. Ask for their feedback.

5)      Do your research. Research your options. Learn about the platforms, and decide which are most appropriate for your brand. Don’t hesitate to ask for help!

6)      Set targets and measure performance. It’s important for a brand to measure social media performance. How do I gauge success? Some key performance metrics to track include:

–          Shares of social media conversations

–          Social media following (Is your audience growing?)

–          Reach: Is your content engaging? How many people are seeing your messages?

–          Overall engagement: Are you getting likes, comments and shares on Facebook, re-tweets on Twitter, pins on Pinterest, etc.

Now that you and your brand are ready to take the social media plunge, keep this in mind – “Brands should focus more on how to BE social, and less on how to DO social media.”

Meat guys and social media

“Did you check-in?”

This is a question my friends and I often ask each other when we go anywhere and everywhere. It could be a hot new restaurant in the city, grocery shopping at our Whole Foods Market®, or a new clothing store on Michigan Avenue. It seems we are always electronically connected to each other, sharing details on new product findings, sales/deals (I love a good sale!) and anything different or unique.

Between Facebook®, Twitter®, Yelp®, YouTube® and Foursquare®, social media has become a part of our daily lives and engrained in our culture. It has completely changed the way consumers receive information and communicate with each other, and is a modern form of word-of-mouth marketing. Marketers from almost every industry have made social media a significant part of their marketing programs. I say almost because… well, the meat industry has only had minimal participation. [Read more…]

The “Secret” is Out! How to Score Big in the Social Space

Remember the scene from the 1996 classic film, Space Jam, when Michael Jordan hands his pals on the Tune Squad the “Secret Stuff?”  Along with some help from Bugs Bunny, MJ was able to pull a fast one on his teammates. He was able to convince them that his magic elixir (water) could help them defeat the evil MonStars. Lucky for him, it worked!

Where you going with this, you might ask? Well…unlike the contents of Michael Jordan’s water bottle, there really is “secret stuff” that can help lead your team to a successful social strategy.

What is this “secret?” It lies in your mindset. Unlike in a fictitious, animated basketball game where winning or losing is the only thing that matters, in the social game, capturing key learning’s and listening to your audience is the secret that will eventually lead to success.

That’s right, in order to be successful you have to take a step back and realize the importance of experimentation, testing and most importantly, listening.

Take, for instance, our work with Tyson Fresh Meats, Inc., and their Star Ranch Angus® beef brand. Throughout 2014, we were tasked with increasing engagement across all of Star Ranch Angus beef’s digital platforms, with a particular focus on their Facebook page.

Our first tactic was to re-think the brand’s current approach to strategy. Instead of “doing” social media, we positioned the brand to “become” social by developing and experimenting with fun, relevant content, geared toward engaging the audience. We paid close attention to metrics, gauging the type of content that sparked reactions. We then focused on those themes to make sure we were giving our audience the content they wanted to see.  Along with testing options in our targeted advertising, we implemented a giveaway campaign that served as the primary traffic driver on the brand’s page. The campaign helped establish a dedicated following that we now refer to as “our community.”

Following the shift in strategy, we saw significant increases not only in engagement, but in following as well. The success of the Facebook page also contributed to increases in web visits and to the addition of another social platform for the brand, Pinterest.

So, when thinking about the next step in your social adventure, keep in mind that, even though you don’t have six championship rings or a team of misfit cartoon characters, you have everything you need to be successful. Take the time to experiment, test and listen, and you’ll be on your way to becoming the “Michael Jordan” of the social space.

To see more of our work with Star Ranch Angus beef, check out this case study chronicling our digital efforts.

The Social Brand

Social media – It’s no longer just a phrase, but a culture; a living, breathing and growing world.  Social media has created an arena where real people come to make meaningful connections in a virtual world. In less than a decade, a site that was created overnight for an elite group of college students has grown into an integrated online community of more than 800 million active users that can communicate in more than 70 languages. Social media has not only changed communication, but redefined it.

The social media boom has brought to light the importance of having a social brand strategy as part of a brand’s development. Creating a social brand strategy may seem like an impossible task to anyone unfamiliar with this once in a generation phenomenon, but there is a starting block for everything.  [Read more…]

Interactive Marketing Manager

Overview

The Interactive Marketing Manager will develop and oversee the execution of interactive marketing programs intended to strengthen brand recognition, expand and drive new revenue and support clients’ digital initiatives.

Marketing Responsibilities

  • Develop, implement and lead team through marketing campaigns including establishing program objectives, creation of messaging and brand strategies and the selection of appropriate digital channels
  • Work with account management to identify untapped revenue potential for clients and develop web-based marketing campaigns to boost these revenue streams
  • Educate team members on the implementation of interactive marketing programs; assist with the development and monitoring of campaigns and the development of marketing plans.
  • Serve as contact for clients and vendors
  • Create or oversee the creation on interactive marketing plans across multiple marketing channels
  • Work with clients and internal teams to develop proposals to support brand development initiatives
  • Monitor organic search performance of sites and recommend changes to improve search position
  • Oversee the creation, monitoring and analysis of paid search campaigns for marketing campaigns
  • Oversee the creation of social media campaigns to reach target audiences and ensure messaging is on strategy
  • Work closely with content management and website development teams to ensure the user experience is easy and results in maximum conversion and revenue generation
  • Track and monitor the performance of all interactive marketing programs and propose changes to improve overall program performance

Team Responsibilities

  • Work with Human Resources in recruiting process of new team members. Provide new hire overview of digital functions, interactive media outlets and branding messages
  • Provide oversight and direction to digital team members in accordance with Midan policies and procedures
  • Coach, mentor and develop digital team members, including onboarding for new team members and providing career development planning and opportunities
  • Empower team members to take responsibility for their jobs. Delegate responsibilities, expect results, hold accountable and provide regular feedback
  • Foster a spirit of teamwork and unity among team that allows for disagreement over ideas, conflict and expeditious conflict resolution
  • Enable the success of each team member and the team as a whole by showing appreciation towards diversity as well as cohesiveness, supportiveness and working effectively together
  • Consciously create a workplace culture that is consistent with Midan’s mission, vision, guiding principles and core values
  • With assistance of creative communications director, guide digital team members using a performance management and development process that provides an overall context and framework to encourage contribution and includes goal setting, feedback and performance development planning. In conjunction with the creative communications director, develop digital team goals annually and monitor team individual goals quarterly
  • Maintain team member work schedules including assignments, training, vacation and other paid time off, telecommuting and coverage for absenteeism
  • Maintain transparent communicatiwith team members

Qualifications

  • 7 to 10 years’ work experience in interactive marketing
  • Full understanding of interactive marketing distribution channels and strategies
  • Excellent organizational and presentation skills
  • Track record in developing and administering interactive marketing programs
  • Must be a self-starter, highly organized, and able to work well with professional staff and clients at all levels in the organization
  • Desire and ability to think strategically and outside the box
  • Willingness to constantly think, learn and be challenged

Education, Training and Network

Bachelor’s degree in Marketing, Communications or related field

Google certification preferred

Iowa Premium Webpage


Welcome to Midan Marketing

From the farmers who help bring calves and piglets into the world to the families who enjoy dinners created around a tender, mouthwatering entrée, we are the only marketing firm that understands the complete meat channel. We’re proud to present the materials below as a display of our skill and passion for delivering premium marketing services within the meat industry.


Examples of Video Work

Tyson® Crafted Creations® Brand Animated Video

The exciting variety of modern flavor offered in each Tyson® Crafted Creations® product is brought to life by this visually bold animation.

Watch Video

Open Prairie Natural Angus Beef Rancher Video

A look into the daily lives of the hardworking ranchers who bring you the wholesome flavor Open Prairie Natural Angus beef is known for.

Watch Video

National Pork Board Cutting Video Sales Tool

Engaging, informative content is a digital marketing must. This short video is part of a Cutting Guide series that shows best practices for pork cutting.

Watch Video

Star Ranch Angus® Beef Stop Motion Video

A fun video that incorporates the fresh visual appeal of stop motion to encourage and teach viewers to cook this summer-inspired recipe.

Watch Video


National Agri-Marketing Association
Award-Winning Materials

Website Directed to Consumers

Designed to educate, inspire and entice, this fun-to-navigate website corresponds with the Tyson® Crafted Creations® brand look and feel.

View Materials

Trade Advertisement

Inspired by the blank canvas that is every high-quality cut of Chairman’s Reserve® Certified Premium Beef, this print ad captures attention with bold simplicity.

View Materials

Social Media Campaign Directed to Consumers

Engaging our online community, this contest helped spark a spirit of creativity in the kitchen with the great flavor and versatility of Star Ranch Angus® beef.

View Materials

AMC 2017 Top 10

midan-marketing-team-photoBigger than ever before (with 1,300 attendees!), the Annual Meat Conference (AMC) 2017 was an awesome opportunity to hear from experts across all phases of the meat industry about what’s next for our favorite proteins. We came prepared with our trusty notepads and pens to capture the key takeaways, and we had our work cut out for us. See below for our Top 10 learnings. What were your key findings from AMC 2017? Please share below!

Midan’s AMC 2017 Top 10 takeaways:

  1. New consumer segments can help the meat industry zero in on target customers
    New research segments meat consumers into six distinct groups with unique meat shopping attitudes and behaviors. (Michael Uetz & Danette Amstein, Midan Marketing, Meat Consumer Segmentation). Learn more here.

  2. Foreign trade remains a crucial part of meat industry success
    Forecasters predict a 4.5% increase in meat exports in 2017. Export markets must grow significantly to keep supply and demand in balance. (Randy Blach, CattleFax, Market Outlook for Meat and Poultry)

  3. The meat industry continues to face stiff competition from alternative protein sources
    There are 39% more food items with protein claims on the market today than there were four years ago. (Anne-Marie Roerink, 210 Analytics, The Power of Meat: An In-Depth Look at Meat through the Shopper’s Eyes)

  4. “Environmental eating” is dramatically impacting agriculture
    Today’s agriculture has two marketplaces: Commodity [Filling/Financial] vs. Value-Added [Feelings/Flavor]. Value-added food has a “feel good” story that sells social consciousness. (Damian Mason, Agriculture: Trends, Topics, and Tomorrow)

  5. Consumers deepen bonds with brands through shared values
    61% of consumers will not buy a product if it does not meet societal obligations. (Tish Van Dyke, Edelman, Modern Marketing in the New Media Environment)

  6. Organic offers big opportunities for increased basket rings at the register
    For total U.S., annual dollars per household spent on organic is $126. “True Believers” on the spectrum of consumer segmentation spend nearly triple that amount. (Larry Levin and Steve Ramsey, IRI, The Impact of Organic and No Antibiotics Ever Positioning on Total Store Sales)

  7. There were 540 food recalls in 2016
    Food crises unfold in a predictable sequence. Prepare in advance for a food safety issue by creating an incident guide that includes staged messaging to address possible scenarios. (Jeff Hahn, Hahn Public, Emerging Consumer Concerns and Issues Management)

  8. Pig farmers are connecting directly with consumers
    The next generation of pig farmers is successfully using social media platforms (check out @RealPigFarming on Twitter) to share photos of day-to-day farm life. (Brad Greenway, US Farmers and Ranchers Alliance and Angela Anderson, National Pork Board, Communicating the Story to Consumers)

  9. Opportunity for companies ready to tailor food offerings to meet personal health needs
    While past nutrition guidelines have focused on “one size fits all” recommendations, consumers now expect a more customized approach to health and nutrition. Companies who take action now will lead the future of food (and health). (Simon Negri, A.T. Kearney and Jennifer Bentz, Tyson Foods, Inc., Personalized Nutrition: An Industry Disruptor?)

  10. FSIS easing into new requirements for ground beef recordkeeping
    FSIS has taken a six-month “soft approach” to enforcing the ground beef recordkeeping rule that became effective on 10/1/16. Retailers attempting to comply with the new rule aren’t likely to be disciplined; operators aware of the rule but ignoring it could face as-yet-unspecified disciplinary action. A new notice outlining how FSIS will enforce infractions is expected within 6-8 weeks. (Mark Dopp, North American Meat Institute and Hilary Thesmar, Food Marketing Institute, Regulatory Update)

Topics that Shaped 2016

At Midan, it is our job to pay attention to what is happening in the meat industry and beyond. Each week we comb the headlines, not only to keep up-to-date, but to identify patterns that could become trends that impact our industry. As we look back at the past year, a few prominent themes emerge that are likely to continue to require our attention in 2017.

Millennials: The challenge is different with this generation – we simply can’t lump them into a nice, neat category. After all, these “kids” have redefined individualism! One thing is certain: they are a large population force to be reckoned with and their impact has led to shifts in how businesses market to them. Millennials grew social media, heightened consumer consciousness about issues like sustainability and led the charge for clean labels, all while demanding bold flavors and convenient meal options. Complicated? Yes! Worth the effort? You bet!

Want to learn more about Millennials? Check out Michael’s blog on meat-specific Millennial research that we released this year and get additional insight from these articles:

Clean Labels: “Free From,” “Does Not Include” and “No <insert here>” – You are familiar with these kinds of claims because many of you make them. We have evolved from touting USDA grade to branded meat products to branded meat products that differentiate themselves with key attributes. Most of these attributes now focus on what is not in the product.

“Natural” as a claim is losing staying power with beef, but not so much with other proteins, according to Nielsen data. Claims such as “Antibiotic-Free” and “Minimally Processed” have seen significant growth:  antibiotic-free beef sales for the 52 weeks ending 8/27/16 were $321 million. The numbers prove this is more than a fad.

If you are in the beef business and not talking about what to do with your “natural” labels, it’s time. If you are in the prepared business and aren’t removing words consumers don’t understand from your ingredient list, it’s time. If you are a retailer, take note of how you describe what is in your meat case. If you are a chef, it’s time to add to your next round of menus.

Read more about the impact of clean labels:

GMOs:  As a meat industry, we have (for the most part) been able to sit on the sidelines and watch this one unfold. Turns out the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) unveiled two years’ worth of review and proclaimed, “There is no evidence that GMOs are risky to eat.” This declaration did not stop consumers or Congress. Sales of non-GMO food products have soared in the past four years and aren’t showing signs of slowing…yet. Lawmakers brought forth new regulations on how GMOs should be labeled. Although the bill (penned after NAS’s proclamation) exempts foods where meat and poultry are the main ingredients, we still need to keep our eye on it.

This issue is really about something much bigger than GMOs. It is about transparency and consumer trust, and how easy it is to lose one without the other. Whatever the next hot topic is for the meat industry, we need to be prepared to leave the safety of the sidelines and respond.

Read more about 2016 GMO news:

Social Media:  Don’t groan! We need to talk about it, because social media has exploded beyond just B2C.  Marketing is about relationships and it turns out both customers and consumers are …wait for it…human! Marketing is moving to more of a “human-to-human” (H2H) philosophy. So whether you participate in the social media world or not, your customers and your consumers do. If you want them to know about you, you’ve gotta be where they are. Period.

adult-social-media-users
Not sure where to start with social media?  Get tips from a variety of helpful blogs in our archives.

Read more about the social media explosion:  

Got other 2016 topics that should be on this list?  Please leave me a comment – I always love to hear from you!

About the author:
As a Principal of Midan Marketing, Danette is always thinking strategically about how to move the meat industry forward. Her lifelong love for the meat industry began on her family’s farm in Kansas and continues today in her passionate work for meat clients. Midan provides integrated marketing strategies, branding programs, digital media platforms, creative communications, public relations and market research services designed to help make meat more relevant to consumers. 

2017 Planning: Take Your Cues from 2016

Ah, fall is finally here!  The temperature has cooled down and that means it’s time for sweatshirts, pumpkin spice hot chocolate and Fantasy Football (Wish me luck — I’m a rookie!). It is also the period when we start mapping out marketing plans for next year.

2016-man-leaping_377448043

In preparation for this blog, I reviewed what I outlined in last year’s planning blog and soon realized that the 7 points that I highlighted for 2016 are more relevant than ever. Some are especially significant now that we are getting a better handle on Millennials’ and Boomers’ meat consumption habits through our recent research. So my advice here is simple: read and repeat! (Just think of that genius marketing phrase from the shampoo bottle: “Lather, Rinse, Repeat.” If something is effective, do it again!)

Some of you have been working on these areas. I see it: in your advertising, in-store POS, social media posts, packaging, etc. As someone deeply invested in the meat industry, I am inspired when I observe these kinds of positive changes that move us forward. Now that you have started, keep the course. If you haven’t embraced these ideas to up your marketing ante, pick one or two that could have the biggest impact on your business and get started.

If you have read this far and are not the “marketing guy,” then please forward this blog to him/her and ask how these items can be incorporated into the marketing plan for next year.

Wondering how you should apply these to your company and/or brands? I welcome your questions and comments. And feel free to leave me a Fantasy Football tip – I can use all the help I can get!

Watch our “2017 Planning” Midan Minute Video

 

Millennials, Unfiltered

My name is Gibson and I’m a Millennial. You’ve seen my name attached to several blogs written from the Millennial perspective. Loyal blog readers have gone grocery shopping with me, grilled ribeyes with me and even sat in a classroom of carcasses with me. I’m a member of the elusive generation that everyone is talking about. The generation old enough to remember the days of dial-up internet, but too young to know a time without Justin Timberlake. The generation that knows Google as a verb and the ‘Gram as something other than a S’mores ingredient. (That’s short for Instagram, for you non-Millennials.) And as the generation of 75 million strong that is approaching its prime spending years and taking its money to the meat counter, it may be time to get to know us.

To better understand generational shopping patterns, Midan conducted a study comparing Millennials and Boomers. These two influential consumer groups were asked about meat consumption, preferences and attitudes toward meat and health, and the results are pretty spot on, according to this Millennial. While some of the findings made me feel like there must have been a hidden camera in my kitchen, others were not as applicable to my eating or shopping habits; however, I can easily see how they would apply to my fellow Millennials.

Here are the big five that stood out to me:

Health

“Millennials are more concerned about health as related to meat consumption.”

I generally maintain a healthy diet and lifestyle. (It may have something to do with my obsession with icing as a child and perhaps I’m now overcorrecting that processed sugar intake by eating fruit for lunch…) I also enjoy learning about healthy foods. Speaking on behalf of Millennials, if we have a question, we ask – or rather, we Google. Because we have so many sources of information in the palm of our hand, we are able to learn more about the food on our plates – and when a popular food blogger on Pinterest tells you the benefits of using a certain ingredient over another, it’s easy to make that switch.

Meal Prep

“Millennials feel a sense of accomplishment when they prepare a complicated dish and enjoy trying new meat recipes.”

Yes and yes! Or as we say in Millennial world, “YASS.” Raise your hand if you’ve ever Instagrammed a meal you cooked. *hand raised emoji* I don’t know if there’s ever a night that I’ve cooked a meal, and I don’t look out of the corner of my eye to catch my husband’s reaction after the first bite. I love cooking and I love trying new recipes and most of all, I love when the hubs says, “This is a keeper!”

Convenience

“Prepared meat accounts for about 44 percent of Millennials’ meat purchases.”

It all boils down to convenience. While I do enjoy trying new recipes, I want an easy, healthy meal that can be made after I’m finished with Tuesday night tennis but before one of my adored TV shows comes on. I also want little cleanup – I mean, how am I supposed to live tweet Grey’s Anatomy with sudsy hands?! Again, convenience is key and prepared meats accomplish that.

Social Attitudes

“Millennials are more easily influenced. Some Millennials think that meat is becoming less socially acceptable and in a social setting are much more likely than Boomers to adjust their meat consumption to align with the group.”

This, I get. It sounds silly, but the concept of social influence does apply to me. Just last weekend I was out to dinner with girlfriends and I had my eye on a steak. It was topped with fried onions and served with mashed potatoes and I wanted it bad. But I didn’t want to be the only one at the table who ordered a steak. Lucky for me, half the table ordered that beauty and we all nearly cleaned our plates. So, while social attitudes didn’t prevent me from purchasing meat in that situation, the thought crossed my mind.

Meat Substitutes

“More than four in 10 Millennials have consumed meat alternatives in the past 12 months.”

These are the most common meat alternatives: tofu, soy-based meat and texturized vegetable protein. I kind of go back and forth on this one. At first I think, “If I want meat I’m going to eat meat – not a non-meat alternative.” And then I remember my work snack: almonds. While nuts are not listed above as a meat alternative, they are an alternate protein source. I eat about a handful of almonds every day (the amount of handfuls correlates with the extent of my workload). I know I need protein to stay alert during the day and on top of ever-changing social media trends!

While we’re a group defined by our birthdays, tech savviness and binge watching of Netflix, these survey results can help you better understand how to speak to us about meat. And if done successfully, who knows – your product could end up as the subject of an Instagram post #nofilter.

To get the full scoop on the Millennials vs. Baby Boomers study, you can read Part 1 and Part 2 in the Shelby Report, or get the video recap from Michael here. For more Millennial perspective, just leave me a comment!

 

 

photo-credit